Baglietto 46M

by Baglietto with Francesco Paszkowski Design and Margherita Casprini

Baglietto is one of those names that evoke a long history of boats and ships of every kind – a 160-year history featuring a hugely varied range of vessels. It is a shipyard that, while committed to the constant development of the craft it produces, can never disregard the tradition that defines it.

The yard’s current management knows this very well, and expresses it with enthusiasm and justified pride. It is no accident that the projects recently presented to the public include the MV13, a 13-metre motorboat with lines reminiscent of the historic military vessels produced by Baglietto in the first half of the 20th century. In the same tradition, Baglietto’s managing director, Silvia Fogliuzzi, has told us that the projects to be built in the near future will also feature an MV19, conceptually a copy of the MV13 but on a larger scale. Why all this introduction before talking about the ship we are focusing on in this article? Simply because the current management and Owners are, in our view rightly, closely connected with the history of the shipyard. It is a history of successes expressed in cutting-edge designs – boats and ships that were milestones in the technological development of the Italian shipbuilding industry. Baglietto’s managing director, Silvia Fogliuzzi, talks about tradition and progress in relation to this new 46-metre yacht, which was presented at the shows in Cannes and Monte Carlo in autumn. “It’s true that Baglietto’s 46-metre displacement line has quite a long history, but this vessel is actually the first one built after major restyling work, and represents the future of the shipyard. The response we have received at the shows where we presented her has been very gratifying, with all the ship’s characteristics understood and appreciated – so much so that we are now producing the carpentry for a new vessel which differs only in a few details on the transom. Our collaboration with Francesco Paszkowski continues to be mutually satisfactory. We have already developed the new 46- and 43-metre fast line, to be presented next year, and the new 55-metre displacement which is already under construction. In short, the areas we are most interested in at Baglietto in terms of both displacement and planing hulls continue to move forward. However, we are also involved in smaller projects such as the MV19, following the smaller MV13 presented last year, which was particularly popular in the US. In terms of naval architecture, we worked on the excellent design by Sculati, just as we did for the 55 metre and the 54 metre. For the Fast line, we wanted the ideal compromise between Sculati’s excellent hulls and larger spaces and volumes. We are also working with a Dutch company to develop innovative propulsion and construction solutions. The 46 metre we have just presented inherited the hull and superstructures we had in the yard when the current ownership took over. We decided to complete the vessel without an owner because her technological characteristics are contemporary and with work on the systems and fittings we have made her a cutting-edge yacht, based on highly prized naval engineering. She is a displacement vessel designed to handle long-range cruises in the utmost comfort while remaining below the 500 GT level, a very important feature. Our objective is to see what we are producing and presenting today as a milestone on a long-term journey in which Baglietto emerges as a product of the highest quality. Everything we do is intended to confirm Baglietto’s position as a brand of uncompromisingly high value, and this can only be done with boats and ships whose design and build quality unfailingly impresses. To date, we have not communicated extensively because we have chosen to give our products the task of conveying our message when it comes to the desire to make Baglietto a brand worthy of its history.”

Now let’s move on to an analysis of this ship, which represents a turning point for the yard and the first sign of its future production. We asked Francesco Paszkowski what all this represents: “The design for this vessel comes from a clear desire to give voice to the shipyard’s new era while keeping faith with the stylistic elements and details that make a Baglietto recognisable. All of this was more complex than it would have been if we were starting from a blank page with no links to the past. The result of this blend of experience and exploratory research is a contemporary vessel but one that brings Baglietto’s history with her, in her dynamic, sleek lines that project forward yet are softened by windows and struts. I worked on the interiors with Margherita Casprini. For this project built “on spec”, we chose a contemporary style that is a long way from classic aesthetic standards but also far from minimalism, which we used only for a few small details to allow us to achieve light, calm and sophisticated elegance.

We worked extensively on the materials, the lighting, everything, to achieve unmatched levels of comfort. The combination of natural light, of which we made the fullest possible use, and artificial light was something we studied in depth, in terms of both the materials chosen and the positioning of each individual element. Although the layout is based on a traditional design, it contains some innovative stylistic solutions. For example, on the main deck you go directly into the living area instead of having a buffer zone between the exterior and the lounge, where there is no dining area as this has instead been placed on the upper deck. We used glass walls in the various corridors on board to provide visual contact with shared sections of the vessel, at the same time as favouring the perception of the space. This solution also makes it possible to increase the light in specific areas, such as the lobby. We also used horizontal and vertical mirrors, with the twofold function of contributing to enhancing the light on one hand and the perception of space on the other. The galley also has a transparent wall allowing it to receive natural light. The Owner’s suite on the main deck covers a huge area thanks to the wide body solution adopted for the forward section of the structure, a very discreet space where the Owner enjoys total privacy. Numerous elements of the furniture, such as beds, bedside tables and other details, are free-standing, designed in part as decorative elements.” Both the shipyard’s managing director and the designer told us a great deal more than we have summarised here, but one concept is clear in their comments: keeping faith with the Baglietto tradition, from both a formal and a technical point of view, by developing modern designs that are always linked to the yard’s history. Baglietto is certainly a brand with the capacity to heighten the prestige of the Italian boatbuilding industry, and its current production and development plans for the range are ambitious projects worthy of its history. The Baglietto 46M is a displacement yacht with a length overall of 46.30 m and a beam of 9.50 m, making for a top speed of 17.5 knots and a range of 4,500 nautical miles at cruising speed. She is nonetheless below the 500 GRT limit – 498 GRT to be precise – and offers 12 guests unfailingly comfortable accommodation. In addition to the full-beam Owner’s suite in the forward section on the main deck, the lower deck features four guest cabins. The guest accommodation is divided into two VIP cabins amidships, forward of which there are two cabins each with twin beds and an additional pull-out bed. The decision to create five cabins in total made it possible to ensure that each one has decidedly generous available space. Moreover, this choice left a substantial portion of the hull free for the crew quarters, ensuring that the crew enjoy the comfort that makes a difference over long cruises, benefitting the Owner and guests as well. The engine room is also on the lower deck, to aft of the main section, while all the ship’s sensitive systems are managed from a control room. The latter is properly insulated but has sight over the main machinery and systems. To aft of this technical area you find the beach area in place of the usual garage, featuring gym equipment, a day head and a versatile area with loose furniture that can be used as required. Moving aft from here, you access the aft bridge which has mooring points for tenders. These vessels, a 17’ tender and an inflatable rescue boat, are garaged in the forward section of the superstructure, from which they can be hauled using a disappearing crane. It should be noted that the external area where the tenders are garaged while the yacht is underway can be used as an additional area for open-air entertaining, for which purpose it can be covered using special awnings. As mentioned earlier, the main salon does not include a dining area, and instead the entire space is dedicated to relaxation with sofas affording a pleasing view of the sea, even while guests are seated. The dining area is located on the upper deck, in the aft section bordering a further open-air relaxation area. Alongside the indoor area this can be experienced as one space thanks to large windows that open to link the two spaces. This deck also has a day head, the central tower connecting all the decks, then the captain’s cabin with a private bathroom. This offers access to the radio room and bridge, which is extremely modern and features latest-generation systems. The final deck, the sun deck, has a large surface area with an open-air galley, a dining table, a sofa with armchairs and small tables, and to aft, a sunbathing area with beach chairs and plenty of room for open-air parties. It is notable that the forward section of this deck is protected overhead by a hard top, which is successfully and seamlessly integrated into the sleek lines of the yacht’s profile. During our visit on board, we were able to see that the intention of keeping faith with tradition while offering a cutting-edge design has been consistently realised on this yacht. Everything you could expect of a latest-generation vessel is here on the Baglietto 46M, while at the same time her lines and build quality testify eloquently to a 160-year-long history.

 

Angelo Colombo

Photos by Emilio Bianchi

Baglietto Technical Specifications

Hull typeFull displacement, twin propeller motor yacht
Material of hullHigh tensile steel
Material of superstructureAluminium
LOA 46.30 m / 12’231’’ ft
Beam9.50 m / 2’509’’ ft
Draft2,80 m / 0’739’’ ft
Half load displacement400 tons approx
Main enginesCaterpillar 3512B DITA-SWAC
Maximum speed17,5 knots
Range at cruising speedup to 4,500 nm
Maximum power2 x 1,455 kW (1,977 hp) at 1,835 rpm
GeneratorsTwin 125 kW, 400/230V 3 phase diesel
Active fin stabilizersAnti-roll stabilization system under way and at anchor
Fuel capacity80,000 litres / 21,133.76 US gallons
Fresh water capacity19,000 litres / 5,019.268 US gallons
Holding tank2,200 litres / 581.178 US gallons
Gray water tank3,000 litres / 792.516 US gallons
International gross tonnage498 GRT
AccomodationLuxury area 300 m²
Crew area 112 m²
Guest10 - 12
Crew9
Hull and engineeringBaglietto S.p.A.
Exterior designFrancesco Paszkowski Design
Interior designFrancesco Paszkowski Design in collaboration with Margherita Casprini
BuilderBaglietto S.p.A. www.baglietto.com baglietto@baglietto.com
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